Friday, March 10, 2006

Tragedy strategy.

***UPDATED BELOW*****

The kids and I love tongue twisters, so I thought I'd send us off into the weekend with a few of our favorites, including one we made up ourselves, and The English Language's Most Dangerous Tounge Twister*

I've noticed that most tongue twisters are based on the 's' and 'th' phonemes. I've noticed that after a while, my kids are able to pick up new twisters with those sounds much quicker than others, so I've tried to give them a mix of dental and labial challenges.

They just think they're fun.

Some of our favorites:

  • Which witch wished which wicked wish?
  • Freshly-fried flying fish.
  • Please pay promptly.
  • Six thick thistle sticks. Six thick thistles stick.
  • Lovely lemon liniment.
  • The sixth sheik's sixth sheep is sick.


And the one we made up:
  • I licked the liquored lizard's liver.

And now, The English Language's Most Dangerous Tounge Twister*
(SFX: drumroll)
I slit the sheet
The sheet I slit
And on the slitted sheet I sit!**

Have a great weekend everyone.
Don't hurt your tongues.

Yeharr


*please don't try it in polite company
**some folks counter that this one's equally dangerous:
Sarah sitting in her Chevrolet,
All she does is sits and shifts,
All she does is sits and shifts.
To which I reply: it may be dangerous, but it's not as clever, relying on a repeated line to ensure the danger. So there.

ADDENDUM:
Saurabh has come in strong with a tongue twister that, quite frankly, kicks the slitted sheet out of my most dangerous ones:

I am not the pheasant plucker,
I'm the pheasant plucker's mate.
I am only plucking pheasants
'cause the pheasant plucker's running late.


Saurabh is a clever boy. I must destroy him.

8 Comments:

Blogger Jessica said...

Fabulous fricatives.

10:02 PM  
Blogger mal said...

AAARRRGGGHHHH! *L*

4:47 PM  
Blogger Brownie said...

and let's hear it for the woodchucks:
How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?
The patois:
And since I followed your Can You Fly comment at Rowenas, where you were wondering about 'rack off' ... In Australia, 'chuck' means to throw with abandon; throwing up is sometimes called 'chucking' too.
'rack off' means 'to go away! and I am.

9:23 AM  
Blogger Balloon Pirate said...

Brownie--Thanks for the info. Come back any time.

Where I live, woodchucks are called groundhogs, so I created this variation:

How much ground could a groundhog hog if a groundhog could hog ground?

Yeharr

9:28 AM  
Blogger saurabh said...

Here's a candidate for 'most dangerous':

I am not the pheasant plucker,
I'm the pheasant plucker's mate.
I am only plucking pheasants
'cause the pheasant plucker's running late.

1:25 AM  
Blogger Balloon Pirate said...

I bow to you, saurabh, even though I have no idea how to pronounce your name.

Yeharr

10:22 AM  
Blogger Timmy said...

seven sexy siamese sailors sailed the seven seas by ferry boat.

12:08 PM  
Blogger Colleen said...

LOL!

makes me think of this local commercial about free flee spray. if you can say it 5 times fast they'll give you a gift card to the store. LOL!

2:47 PM  

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